Dr. Gwo-Huei Luo new director of NSRRC

Approved by the Executive Yuan, Dr. Gwo-Huei Luo will officially assume the position on August 1, 2018 as the 5th Director of the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), Taiwan for a four-year term.

Dr. Luo is an expert on accelerator physics, microwave engineering, and cryogenic superconducting engineering. Because of his highly-recognized contributions to accelerators, he has served as an advisory committee member of several international accelerator facilities. He has played a leading role in the management, construction, and commissioning of the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS), which is one of the brightest light sources in the world. In 2016, the Nishikawa Tetsuji Prize for a recent, significant, original contribution to the accelerator field, with no age limit was awarded to Dr. Luo for his outstanding contributions to accelerators at NSRRC, Taiwan.

>Read more on the NSRRC website

Angular measurement goes nano

At Diamond Light Source we have built and developed a state-of-the art optical metrology laboratory which is equipped with instruments to test and inspect extremely precise mirrors used to focus X-rays for Diamond’s beamlines.

To calibrate this measuring equipment we needed a device that can produce very tiny angle changes in a precise and controlled way.

Imagine a 1m long spirit level set on a flat surface, then place a 1mm spacer under one end. That gives an angular change of 1/1,000 of a radian or 1 milliradian. Radians are an alternative way of describing angles instead of degrees.

Now, instead of a 1m spirit level, we use a 1000km long spirit level, with a 1mm spacer under one end. This would create an angular change of  1 nanoradian, which is exactly what Diamond’s Nano-angle generator (NANGO) can accuractely create.

Image: Diamond-NANGO, with its rotation axis pointing in the horizontal direction.

Young talent from LNLS awarded at international conference

Work on components for Sirius was elected best poster.

Gabriel Vinícius Claudiano, member of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), was awarded the prize for best poster in the category “young engineer under 30” during the tenth edition of the MEDSI (Mechanical Engineering Design of Synchrotron Radiation Equipment and Instrumentation) conference, which was held in Paris, France, between June 25th and 29th.

Gabriel’s work is related to the development of components for the beamlines of the new Brazilian synchrotron light source, Sirius. These components are located at the interface between the storage ring and the beamlines, which is called front-end, and their function is to absorb part of the synchrotron light beam to protect sensitive equipment.

>Read more on the LNLS website

Picture: Gabriel Vinícius Claudiano.

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for N. Mårtensson

The Helmholtz Association has presented the Swedish physicist Nils Mårtensson with a Helmholtz International Fellow Award. 

The synchrotron expert of the University of Uppsala, who heads the nobel comitee for physics, cooperates closely with the HZB-Institute Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research. Nils Mårtensson is a professor at Uppsala University. He directed the development of the Swedish synchrotron radiation source Max IV and received a grant from the European Research Council (ERC) in 2013. Mårtensson is a member of the Swedish Academy of Sciences and chairman of the Nobel Committee for Physics. At HZB, he cooperates with Alexander Föhlisch’s team at HZB-Institute Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research. Together they run the Uppsala Berlin Joint Laboratory (UBjL) to further develop methods and instruments.

Image: Nils Mårtensson, University of Uppsala, cooperates closely with HZB.

W24 SSRL Slider

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is one of the pioneering synchrotron facilities in the world, known for outstanding user support, training future generations and important contributions to science and instrumentation. SSRL is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Stanford University.

W24 FERMI Slider

The program of construction and commissioning through user experiments of the FEL source FERMI, the only FEL user facility in the world currently exploiting external seeding to offer intensity, wavelength and line width stability, achieved all of its intended targets in 2017.

How legionella manipulates the host cell by means of molecular mimics

Using synchrotron light, researchers from CIC bioGUNE have solved the structure of RavN, a protein that Legionella pneumophila uses for stealing functions and resources of the host cell.

Mimicry is the ability of some animals to resemble others in their environment to ensure their survival. A classic example is the stick bug whose shape and colour make him unnoticed to possible predators. Many intracellular pathogens also use molecular mimicry to ensure their survival. A part of a protein of the pathogen resembles another protein totally different from the host and many intracellular microorganisms use this capability to interfere in cellular processes that enable their survival and replication.

The Membrane Trafficking laboratory of the CIC bioGUNE in the Basque Country, led by Aitor Hierro, in collaboration with other groups from the National Institutes of Health in the United States, have been working for several years in understanding how the infectious bacterium Legionella pneumhopila interacts with human cells. During this research, experiments have been carried out at the XALOC beamline of the ALBA Synchrotron and I04 beamline of Diamond Light Source (UK). The results enabled scientists to solve the structure of RavN, a protein of L. pneumophila that uses this molecular mimicry to trick the infected cell.

>Read more on the ALBA website

Figure: (extract) Schematic representation of the structure of RavN1-123 as ribbon diagram displayed in two orientations (rotated by 90° along the x axis). Secondary elements are indicated as spirals (helices) or arrows (beta strands), with the RING/U-box motif colored in orange and the C-terminal structure colored in slate. (Full image here)