Inspiring the next generation by supporting the Year of Engineering

Diamond has pledged its support for the Government’s Year of Engineering 2018.

It is a national campaign to increase awareness and understanding of what engineers do among youngsters aged 7-16, their parents and teachers to tackle the engineering skills gap. Launched in response to an estimated shortfall of 20,000 engineering graduates a year and reports that the skills shortage is having a significant impact on productivity and growth, the Year of Engineering seeks to galvanise industry, policy makers, parents and teachers in a national push to inspire the next generation of engineers.

Diamond will be supporting the campaign by hosting a series of careers and open days throughout the year. These will be designed to inspire interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and to highlight the various roles and career paths available at the synchrotron. Every year, 3,000 members of the general public as well as 3,000 school students visit the facility and this year Diamond will be opening its doors to even more.

Diamond, which last year celebrated its 10th anniversary, will be hosting a careers day on Wednesday 21 February. On the day, delegates will be welcomed to the facility to learn about the engineers and engineering opportunities at Diamond. Delegates will be given the opportunity to tour Diamond’s unique facility and have a meet-and-greet session with experts covering mechanical, electrical and software engineering. Register your interest here.

 

>Read more on the Diamond Light Source website

 

Associate Director Matthew Miller promoted

He is promoted to the rank of fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

CHESS congratulates Professor Matthew Miller, the associate director of CHESS and the director of InSitµ@CHESS, for a recent promotion to the rank of fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

The rank of fellow is bestowed on members who “have been responsible for significant engineering achievements” and have been active members for at least ten years. Professor Miller’s work developing new X-ray techniques, primarily at CHESS, and his development of the In-Sitµ center were mentioned prominently in his award citation, highlighting their importance to the mechanical engineering community. “Professor Matthew P. Miller is an international leader in the development and engineering application of high energy x-rays to probe the micro-structure of materials under live loads. Prof. Miller founded and directs InSitµ@CHESS (Integrated Simulation and x-ray Interrogation Tools and Training for µmechanics at CHESS).

Scientist combines medicine and engineering to repair a damaged heart

Regenerating heart muscle tissue using a 3D printer – once the stuff of Star Trek science fiction – now appears to be firmly in the realm of the possible.

The combination of the Canadian Light Source synchrotron’s unique biomedical imaging and therapy (BMIT) beamline and the vision of a multi-discipline researcher from the University of Saskatchewan in confirming fiction as fact was published in the September issue of Tissue Engineering, one of the leading journals in this emerging global research field of tissue regeneration.

U of S researcher Mohammad Izadifar says he is combining medicine and engineering to develop ways to repair a damaged heart. “The problem is the heart cannot repair itself once it is damaged due to a heart attack.” he explained.

Izadifar has conducted his research out of three places on campus – the College of Engineering, the CLS and the College of Medicine where he has been certified in doing open heart surgery on rats, having trained in all the ethical protocols related to these research animals.