Apply for the Kai Siegbahn prize 2018

The Prize was established in 2009 in honour of Kai Siegbahn, founder of Nuclear Instruments and Methods A (NIMA), who had a strong and lasting commitment to advancing synchrotron radiation science.

The Editorial Board of NIMA is currently accepting nominations for the 2018 award, and we are counting on you to help us identify potential honorees! We invite you to review the award criteria, and to nominate a worthy colleague.

All nominations should be submitted to the Committee Chair by March 31 2018:

Prof. Fulvio Parmigiani, Kai Siegbahn Chair
Department of Physics, University of Trieste
International Faculty, University of Cologne,
Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A.
Email: fulvio.parmigiani@elettra.trieste.it

Nomination criteria:

The Prize aims to recognize and encourage outstanding experimental achievements in synchrotron radiation research with a significant component of instrument development. Particular preference will be given to the development of synchrotron radiation spectroscopies.

Rules and eligibility:

Nominations are open to scientists of all nationalities without regard to the geographical site at which the work was performed. Usually, the prize shall be awarded to one person but it may be shared if all recipients have contributed to the same accomplishment. The prize recipient should be 45 years old or younger at the time of selection.

Nominations are accepted from the NIMA advisory board, the NIMA board of editors, synchrotron radiation facility directors as well as from scientists engaged in synchrotron radiation science. Nomination packages should include a nominating letter, at least one supporting letter, a list of five papers on which the award is based as well as a proposed citation for the award.

Questioning the universality of the charge density wave nature…

… in electron-doped cuprates

The first superconductor materials discovered offer no electrical resistance to a current only at extremely low temperatures (less than 30 K or −243.2°C). The discovery of materials that show superconductivity at much higher temperatures (up to 138 K or −135°C) are called high-temperature superconductors (HTSC). For the last 30 years, scientists have researched cuprate materials, which contain copper-oxide planes in their structures, for their high-temperature superconducting abilities. To understand the superconducting behavior in the cuprates, researchers have looked to correlations with the charge density wave (CDW), caused by the ordered quantum field of electrons in the material. It has been assumed that the CDW in a normal (non-superconducting) state is indicative of the electron behavior at the lower temperature superconducting state. A team of scientists from SLAC, Japan, and Michigan compared the traits of superconducting and non-superconducting cuprate materials in the normal state to test if the CDW is correlated to superconductivity.

>Read more on the SSRL website

Picture: explanation in detail to read in the full scientific highlight (SSRL website)

 

 

 

Complex tessellations, extraordinary materials

Simple organic molecules form complex materials through self-organisation

An international team of researchers lead by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered a reaction path that produces exotic layers with semiregular structures. These kinds of materials are interesting because they frequently possess extraordinary properties. In the process, simple organic molecules are converted to larger units which form the complex, semiregular patterns. With experiments at BESSY II at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin this could be observed in detail.

Only a few basic geometric shapes lend themselves to covering a surface without overlaps or gaps using uniformly shaped tiles: triangles, rectangles and hexagons. Considerably more and significantly more complex regular patterns are possible with two or more tile shapes. These are so-called Archimedean tessellations or tilings.

Materials can also exhibit tiling characteristics. These structures are often associated with very special properties, for example unusual electrical conductivity, special light reflectivity or extreme mechanical strength. But, producing such materials is difficult. It requires large molecular building blocks that are not compatible with traditional manufacturing processes.

 

>Read more on the Bessy II website

Image: The new building block (left, red outline) comprises two modified starting molecules connected to each other by a silver atom (blue). This leads to complex, semiregular tessellations (right, microscope image).
Credit: Klappenberger and Zhang / TUM

Control of magnetoresistance in spin valves

Molecules, due to their wide-ranging chemical functionalities that can be tailored on demand, are becoming increasingly attractive components for applications in materials science and solid-state physics. Remarkable progress has been made in the fields of molecular-based electronics and optoelectronics, with devices such as organic field-effect transistors and light emitting diodes. As for spintronics, a nascent field which aims to use the spin of the electron for information processing, molecules are proposed to be an efficient medium to host spin-polarized carriers, due to their weak spin relaxation mechanisms. While relatively long spin lifetimes are measured in molecular devices, the most promising route toward device functionalization is to use the chemical versatility of molecules to achieve a deterministic control and manipulation of the electron spin.

Spin-polarized hybrid states induced by the interaction of the first molecular monolayers on ferromagnetic substrates are expected to govern the spin polarization at the molecule–metal interface, leading to changes in the sign and magnitude of the magnetoresistance in spin-valve devices. The formation of spin-polarized hybrid states has been determined by spin-polarized spectroscopy methods and principle-proven in nanosized molecular junctions, but not yet verified and implemented in large area functional device architectures.

>Read more on the ALBA website

Image: Magnetoresistance (top) and X-ray spectroscopy (bottom) measurements, evidencing the control of the magnetoresistance sign and amplitude by engineering spin valves with NaDyClq/NiFe and NaDyClq/Co interfaces, and their corresponding interfacial molecule-metal hybridization states.