Steering the outcome of photoionization in a molecule

An important step towards the understanding and control of photoinduced fragmentation processes in molecules has been achieved in an experiment on the H2 molecule taking advantage of the unique properties of the FERMI free-electron laser source in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon energy range.
Molecular dissociation, i.e., the breaking of a chemical bond, is governed by the coupling of electronic and nuclear motion and, once understood and controlled in large systems, e.g., by utilizing ultrashort light pulses, has the potential to impact tremendously photochemical and biochemical applications. A team of both experimentalists and theoreticians from France (CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Université de Bordeaux), Spain (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Germany (European XFEL), and Italy (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste) has demonstrated that the outcome of dissociative (DI) and nondissociative (NDI) photoionization in the simplest of all molecules, H2, can be controlled exploiting nonlinear two-photon ionization with intense femtosecond pulses in the VUV.
The FERMI seeded free-electron laser is currently the only light source worldwide that provides external users access to bright femtosecond pulses at wavelengths in the VUV up to 100 nm, the energy regime required for studying nonlinear two-photon single-ionization in H2. The high spectral resolution and precise tunability of the 100-fs pulses provided by FERMI made it possible to selectively excite single vibrational levels in the neutral intermediate B state of H2 (blue line in Fig. 1). Absorption of a second VUV photon then leads to NDI or DI into the ionic H2+ ground state (green in Fig. 1) or to DI into the first excited H2+2p continuum (orange in Fig. 1). In single-photon single-ionization of H2, the yield of DI is very low – less than 2%. By contrast, recent ab initiocalculations suggest that the ratio of DI/NDI can be increased significantly in resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization and that it can be controlled by varying the pulse duration between 2 and 10 fs.

>Read more on the Elettra website

Image: (a) Schematic of resonant two-photon ionization viathe B intermediate state (12.51 eV). The grey shaded area shows the Franck-Condon region for one-photon absorption from the H2electronic ground state. The dashed purple arrows visualize the range for the absorption of the second FEL photon. The green (red) horizontal line shows the ionization threshold at 15.43 eV (dissociation limit at 18.08 eV). (b) The experimental photoelectron spectrum shows a clear separation of electrons correlated to NDI and DI. For DI, it is close to the prediction of the Condon-reflection approximation, i.e., the projection of the vibrational wavefunction onto the dissociative 2p continuum state. The infinite-time limit calculation (grey line for the convolution of the contributions from the two first ionization continua) reproduces the main features of the spectrum. The differences between experiment and calculation indicates that at FERMI a timescale between ultrafast dynamics and steady-state excitation is probed.

Snaphot of molecular mechanism at work in lethal virus

X-ray crystallography at the Australian Synchrotron contributed to major research findings.

Data collected on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Australian Synchrotron has contributed to major research findings on two deadly viruses, Hendra and Nipah, found in Australia, Asia and Africa. The viruses can be transmitted to humans not directly by the bat which is the natural carrier but by an infected animal like horses or pigs.

Beamline scientist, Dr David Aragao (pictured above), a co-author on the paper in Nature Communications, said that obtaining a clear motion picture of key biological process at the molecular level of viruses is often not available with current biomedical techniques.
“However, using X-ray crystallography from data collected on both MX1 and MX2 beamlines at the Australian Synchrotron, we were able to obtain  8  ‘photograph-like’ snapshots of the molecular process that allows the Hendra and Nipah virus to replicate.“

Two authors of the paper, PhD students Kate Smith and Sofiya Tsimbalyuk, who are co-supervised by Aragao and his collaborator Professor of Biochemistry Jade Forwood of the Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation Charles Sturt University, used the Synchrotron extensively collecting multiple data sets that required extensive refinements over two years to isolate the mechanism of interest.

>Read more on the Australian Synchrotron website

Image: Beamline scientist, Dr David Aragao.

Infrared beams show cell types in a different light

Berkeley Lab scientists developing new system to identify cell differences.

By shining highly focused infrared light on living cells, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) hope to unmask individual cell identities, and to diagnose whether the cells are diseased or healthy.
They will use their technique to produce detailed, color-based maps of individual cells and collections of cells – in microscopic and eventually nanoscale detail – that will be analyzed using machine-learning techniques to automatically sort out cell characteristics.

Using microscopic color maps to unlock cell identity

Their focus is on developing a rapid way to easily identify cell types, and features within cells, to aid in biological and medical research by providing a way to probe living cells in their native environment without harming the cells or requiring obtrusive cell-labeling techniques.
“This is totally noninvasive,” said Cynthia McMurray, a biochemist and senior scientist in Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging (MBIB) Division who is leading this new imaging effort with Michael Martin, a physicist and senior staff scientist at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source (ALS).
The ALS has dozens of beamlines that produce beams of intensely focused light, from infrared to X-rays, for a broad range of experiments.

>Read more on the Advanced Light Source website

Image: From left to right: Aris Polyzos, Edward Barnard, and Lila Lovergne, pictured here at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source, are part of a research team that is developing a cell-identification technique based on infrared imaging and machine learning.
Credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab