One of Sirius’ most important steps: first electron loop around the storage ring

This is one of the most important stages of the largest scientific project in Brazil .

The Sirius project has just completed one of its most important steps: the first electron loop around its main particle accelerator, called the Storage Ring. In this large structure, 518 meters in circumference, the electrons accelerated to very high energies produce synchrotron light: a very bright light used in scientific experiments that could revolutionize knowledge in health, energy, materials and more.
The first loop demonstrates that thousands of components such as magnets, ultra-high-vacuum chambers and sensors are working in sync, and that the entire structure, with parts weighing hundreds of kilograms, have been aligned to micrometer standards (up to five times smaller than a strand of hair) needed to guide the trajectory of the particles.
Sirius is the largest and most complex scientific infrastructure ever built in Brazil and one of the first 4th generation synchrotron light source to be built in the world and it was designed to put Brazil at the forefront of this type of technology.

The next steps of the project include concluding the assembly of the first beamlines: the research stations where scientists conduct their experiments. These stations allow researchers to study the structure of virtually any organic and inorganic materials, such as proteins, viruses, rocks, plants, soil, alloys, among many others, in the atomic and molecular scale with very high resolution and speed.

>Read more on the LNLS (CNPEM) website

Picture: first loop around the storage ring.

First electron beam loops around Sirius’ booster

New Brazilian synchrotron light source will allow unprecedented experiments benefitting many fields

In the early evening of March 8th, when the campus of the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM) was mostly silent, shouts of celebration echoed through the corridors of the Sirius building, the new Brazilian synchrotron light source.
Inside, the team responsible for the installation of the particle accelerators reached another milestone: the first loop around the second among its three accelerators: the booster. It is a finely tuned equipment, along which the electrons must travel with micrometric precision.
After the initial production and acceleration of the electrons in the Linac, the electrons gain more and more energy at each loop around the Booster. When they reach the appropriate energy levels, the electrons are deposited in the main accelerator, called storage ring, where they remain for long periods of time generating synchrotron light.

>Read more on the Brazilian Synchrotron Lights Laboratory (LNLS)

Image: Sirius in Campinas (Brazil).

Bulgarian President visits SESAME

On 15 December, the President of the Republic of Bulgaria, Rumen Radev, paid an official visit to SESAME. Among the 7 delegates accompanying him were the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria, Ekaterina Zakharieva, and Bulgaria’s Ambassador to Jordan, Venelin Lazarov. The visit was prompted by the President’s wish to see at first hand SESAME at work.

Bulgaria is one of the 9 countries forming part of SEEIIST (South East European International Institute for Sustainable Technologies), an intergovernmental project designed to promote science for peace in South East Europe following the CERN model. The other countries are Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, FYR of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Slovenia, and in the Declaration of Intent signed by the 9 countries in 2017 SESAME is cited as an example of a similar initiative that came to fruition.

>Read more on the SESAME website

Image: The Director of SESAME, Khaled Toukan, welcoming the President of Bulgaria, Rumen Radev, and the Bulgarian delegation.
Credit: SESAME

No beam for a while. #SeeUin2020

The 10th December 2018, marks a key date in the history of the ESRF.

Thirty years after the signature of the ESRF Convention, the beam has been stopped for the last time in the original storage ring. Now begins a 20-month shutdown to dismantle the storage ring that has served the international scientific community with bright and reliable X-rays for the last 30 years, to make way for a new and revolutionary X-ray source, the Extremely Brilliant Source (EBS) which will open to users in 2020.

Today, the EBS project is officially entering a new stage, which is the fruit of our hard work of the last four years. Our imagination, engineering design, quality control and assembly, guided by strict project management, has made it possible to start the swap in our tunnel between the old and the new storage ring. This is possible thanks to the great capability of ESRF staff”, said Francesco Sette, ESRF Director General.

>Read more on the ESRF website

New hutches installed as CHESS-U takes shape

The construction portion of the CHESS-U upgrade is nearing completion as teams work to assemble the last of the experimental hutches. While there is still plenty of work to be done, the preparation for becoming a true 3rd-generation lightsource is paying off.

In early 2019, CHESS-U will have an increased energy of the electron beam, from 5.3 to 6.0 GeV, double the current from 100 to 200 mA, and reduction of the horizontal emittance of the x-ray beam from 100nm to 30nm.
While these high energy x-rays will soon benefit researchers from around the world, new hutches are currently being built to contain and control the beam from the new undulator sources being installed. These hutches, or light-tight experimental rooms, will contain the x-rays by using multiple layers of lead for the walls and ceilings with additional shielding at the seams.

The design and installation of these hutches has been carefully coordinated. As utilities, cables and HVAC systems start to enter each room, it is worth noting the clever design that was used in order to retain the radiation-tight rooms. While safety was definitely at the forefront of the engineers’ minds, the ability to streamline the installation process was deliberately considered, and has since proven useful to compensate for any unavoidable delays.

>Read more on the CHESS website

Image: Kurt McDonald, CHESS Operator, helps install a new hutch for Sector 2. The modular design of the hutches has allowed for quicker installation. 

 

Thailand is planning to build its ‘second’ Synchrotron Light Source

Synchrotron light source is the national infrastructure in science and technology for its contribution of research analysis from downstream, midstream, to upstream levels. Being an effective tool for advanced research, synchrotron promotes research targeting industrial applications for product development and innovation.

Thailand’s synchrotron radiation facility, the 2nd generation synchrotron light source, generates electron beam energy at 1.2 GeV covering spectral range from infrared to low-energy X-Rays. With such energy, the capacity of industrial and medical research is restricted due to the necessity of wider research techniques requiring higher energy and intensity of light. To produce high-energy X-Rays, Thailand should be compelled to develop the 4th generation of synchrotron light source with 2.5 times higher electron energy and 100,000 times higher intensity. This improvement aim to enhance research framework and facility service of Thailand to the leading position in medical, industrial, material, agricultural, food, and commercial research, including application and basic research, as well as becoming one of the top leaders in science and technology of Asia Pacific continent.

>Read more on the website of the Synchrotron Light Research Institute

Image: Architectural model of Thailand’s future second Synchrotron Light Source

SIRIUS has more than 50% of its construction works completed

The construction of accelerator floor, the most challenging phase of the building, has recently started.

Sirius – the new fourth-generation synchrotron light source of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) has recently completed more than half of its construction works. The inauguration is expected for 2018, following the first loop of the electron beams in the accelerators.

Sirius will be a state-of-the-art scientific tool for the structural analysis of materials, both organic and inorganic. Its accelerators and beamlines will be housed within a 68,000-square-meter building, which is among the most sophisticated ever built in Brazil, with unprecedented requirements for mechanical and thermal stability.

>Read More

The state of CHESS-U beamlines

The beamline upgrade portion of the CHESS-U project is moving ahead at full steam.

Scientific needs have been identified. A suitable layout for the experimental floor has been devised. The work breakdown structure (WBS) has been created and System Managers have been assigned. Two large contracts have been awarded and designs are being vetted. We are almost ready to cut metal.

One year has passed since I was asked to be Project Manager for the beamline half of what has become the CHESS-U project. With fits and starts, working around an intense operations schedule, CHESS staff have accomplished a remarkable amount of work so far in preparation for the largest upgrade we have tackled in CHESS history. Summer 2016 started off with a series of science workshops to facilitate creating a science case for the future of CHESS. They also provided guidance for fleshing out upgrade concepts leading up to an External Conceptual Design review in December. With those concepts blessed, technical specs and designs proceeded in earnest. Critical paths were identified, leading to contracts being awarded for sector front ends and hutches to local company Advanced Design Consulting (ADC).