Yves Petroff takes over as Director of the LNLS

French physicist was Director-General of the largest European synchrotron between 1993 and 2001 and LNLS’ Scientific Director from 2009 to 2013.

In ceremony held on the morning of August 29th, Yves Pierre Petroff became Director of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Yves Petroff was LNLS’ Scientific Director from November 2009 to March 2013. During the ceremony, Rogério Cesar de Cerqueira Leite, Chairman of the Board of Directors of CNPEM, and Antonio José Roque da Silva, CNPEM’s Director-General and former LNLS Director, highlighted Pretroff’s competence and his history within LNLS.

Yves Petroff is one of the world’s leading specialists in the use of synchrotron light. He received his doctorate in physics from the Ecole Normale Supèrieure of the University of Paris in 1970. Later, he went to the University of California, Berkeley, from 1971 to 1975. During this period, Yves Petroff worked on the investigation of optical properties of solids, having made important developments in the area of Resonant Raman Effect.

In the early 1970s, the first generation of synchrotron accelerators began to be built, focused primarily on particle physics. In 1975, Yves Petroff returned to France to work in the ACO, one of the first synchrotrons in the world, located in Orsay. Pioneering work was performed by Petroff’s team on the use of synchrotron light to understand the properties of solids. His group was also the first in the world to build a Free Electron Laser in the region of visible light.

>Read more on the Brzilian Synchrotron LIght Laboratory (LNLS) website.

>Read also an article published on the ESRF website.

 

Synchrotron infrared beamline optics optimized…

…for nano-scale vibrational spectroscopy. First experimental report of a special optical layout dedicated to correct typical aberrations derived from large extraction ports in IR beamlines.

Infrared nanospectroscopy represents a major breakthrough in chemical analysis since it allows the identification of nanomaterials via their natural (label free) vibrational signatures. Classically powered by laser sources, the experiment called scattering Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (s-SNOM) has become a standard tool for investigations of chemical and optical properties of materials beyond the diffraction limit of light.

Lately, s-SNOM is achieving unprecedent sensitivity range by exploring the outstanding spectral irradiance of synchrotron light sources in the full range of infrared (IR) radiation. In the last few years, the combination of s-SNOM and ultra-broadband IR synchrotron (SINS or nano-FTIR) has helped studies in relevant scientific fronts involving atomic layered materials, fundamental optics, nanostructured bio-materials and, very recently, it was demonstrated to be feasible to work in the far-IR.

IR ports in synchrotron storage rings can be up to a thousand times more brilliant than classical IR black body sources. This advantage allowed IR beamlines to be the only places capable of performing IR micro-spectroscopy for many years. However, in comparison to X-ray ports, IR beamlines require large apertures for allowing long wavelengths to be extracted. Consequently, IR beamlines typically present optical aberrations such as extended source depth and coma.

>Read more on the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory website

Images (extracts): Figure 1 – Proposed optical layout, IR extraction chamber indicating the source depth, conical mirror illustration, aberration-corrected focal spot at the sample stage and nano-FTIR experimental scheme in operation in the IR endstation of the LNLS. Figure adapted from R. Freitas et al., Optics Express 26, 11238 (2018).

A new x-ray technique to unravel electronic properties of actinide compounds

A new research demonstrates a direct and selective way to investigate 5f electrons in actinide compounds as well as their interaction with other valence electrons

Actinides are a series of chemical elements that form the basis of nuclear fission technology, finding applications in strategic areas such as power generation, space exploration, diagnostics and medical treatments, and also in some special glass. Thorium (Th) and Uranium (U) are the most abundant actinides in the Earth’s crust.

Read more on the LNLS website.

Image: X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) measurements for UCu2Si2 and UMn2Si2 performed at temperatures of 10 K and 300 K, respectively.

A new x-ray technique to unravel electronic properties of actinide compounds

A new research demonstrates a direct and selective way to investigate 5f electrons in actinide compounds as well as their interaction with other valence electrons

 

Actinides are a series of chemical elements that form the basis of nuclear fission technology, finding applications in strategic areas such as power generation, space exploration, diagnostics and medical treatments, and also in some special glass. Thorium (Th) and Uranium (U) are the most abundant actinides in the Earth’s crust.

A deeper understanding of the properties of uranium and other actinides is necessary not only for their more efficient use in existing applications but also for proposing new applications. Several open questions remain, progress in this area usually limited in part by the difficulty in handling these materials safely.

The distribution of electrons in the outer orbital of the atoms that make up a given material is what defines whether they are electrical insulators, conductors or semiconductors, as well as whether they are hard or malleable. Other structural, electronic and magnetic properties are also defined by these valence electrons which may undergo electronic hybridization with other orbitals. Such mixture of orbitals modifies material properties influencing oxidation states, the way bonding between atoms takes place, and hence the geometrical arrangement formed in crystals and molecules with actinide elements.

 

>Read more on the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory website

 

LNLS’ Users get together at the 27th RAU

The event had 140 participants from November 22nd to 24th, 2017, on the CNPEM campus.

The Annual Users Meeting of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) attracts Brazilian and foreign researchers every year to the debate, exchange of experiences and integration of the community of users of the Laboratory.

The 27th edition of the event was held from November 22nd to 24th, 2017, on the campus of the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), in Campinas, Brazil. The meeting was attended by 140 participants from different countries.

The meeting began with an overview of the Laboratory facilities by the LNLS Director, Antonio José Roque da Silva, who gave participants the opportunity to get a closer look at the future plans for LNLS, in particular the ongoing construction of the new synchrotron light source Sirius. Sessions throughout the meeting discussed the projects for the Sirius beamlines and for the IT infrastructure, including the control, acquisition and processing of data in the experimental stations of the new source.

LNLS’ Users get together at the 27th RAU

The event had 140 participants from November 22nd to 24th, 2017, on the CNPEM campus

 

The Annual Users Meeting of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) attracts Brazilian and foreign researchers every year to the debate, exchange of experiences and integration of the community of users of the Laboratory.

The 27th edition of the event was held from November 22nd to 24th, 2017, on the campus of the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), in Campinas, Brazil. The meeting was attended by 140 participants from different countries.

The meeting began with an overview of the Laboratory facilities by the LNLS Director, Antonio José Roque da Silva, who gave participants the opportunity to get a closer look at the future plans for LNLS, in particular the ongoing construction of the new synchrotron light source Sirius. Sessions throughout the meeting discussed the projects for the Sirius beamlines and for the IT infrastructure, including the control, acquisition and processing of data in the experimental stations of the new source.

 

>Read more on the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory website

 

LNLS members are awarded

Awards were given in the international conferences ICALEPCS and WIRMS

Two members of the LNLS were recently awarded at international conferences. The engineer Daniel Tavares received the first award granted to early-career professionals by the conference ICALEPCS, related to control systems for large scientific facilities. The researcher Francisco Carlos Barbosa Maia received the award for best poster during the WIRMS event, which brings together staff and users of infrared beamlines from laboratories around the world.

 

LNLS members are awarded

Awards were given in the international conferences ICALEPCS and WIRMS

 

Two members of the LNLS were recently awarded at international conferences. The engineer Daniel Tavares received the first award granted to early-career professionals by the conference ICALEPCS, related to control systems for large scientific facilities. The researcher Francisco Carlos Barbosa Maia received the award for best poster during the WIRMS event, which brings together staff and users of infrared beamlines from laboratories around the world.

Daniel de Oliveira Tavares received the first award from the ICALEPCS (International Conference on Accelerator and Large Experimental Physics Control Systems) conference for early-career professionals for his work on hardware design for Beam Positioning Systems (BPM) and Orbit Feedback, as well as its involvement with the Open Hardware movement.

>Read more on the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory website

 

New catalysts for the synthesis of organic compounds

Research proposes new mechanism for Suzuki-type C-C homocoupling reaction catalyzed by palladium nanocubes

 

The production of chemical compounds from simpler organic molecules is of great importance for various industrial processes. It is based on the bonding between carbons of the precursor organic compounds, aided by catalysts (typically transition metals). These reactions make it possible to obtain natural and synthetic substances for the development of new materials, such as polymers and pharmaceuticals.

In particular, the so-called carbon-carbon (CC) cross-coupling reactions, in which two different precursor molecules are bound to form the final chemical compound, are of such importance that their development granted the 2010 Nobel Prize in chemistry to researchers Richard F. Heck, Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki.

Another type of coupling reaction is the C-C homocoupling reaction, in which two similar precursor molecules bond forming a symmetrical final compound. These reactions began to gain prominence due to their similarities to cross-coupling reactions, which allowed the optimization and development of new catalysts for both mechanisms.

 

>Read more on the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory website

 

Improving the Treatment of Industrial Waste

Research uncovers the mechanism of memory effect of lamellar double hydroxides (LDH).

Synthetic dyes are in constant use in a wide variety of industries, from textile to cosmetics. Both the production and use of these substances can lead to environmental problems if they are not properly degraded or removed from industrial effluents. Among the many physical, chemical or biological processes that can be used for the treatment of such wastes, the adsorption processes are noteworthy for combining low cost and high removal rates.

R. M. M. Santos et al. [1] used the LNLS facilities to investigate the properties of lamellar double hydroxides (LDH), a family of anionic clays with high adsorption capacity, for the removal of synthetic dyes.

SIRIUS HAS MORE THAN 50% OF ITS CONSTRUCTION WORKS COMPLETED

The construction of accelerator floor, the most challenging phase of the building, has recently started.

Sirius – the new fourth-generation synchrotron light source of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) has recently completed more than half of its construction works. The inauguration is expected for 2018, following the first loop of the electron beams in the accelerators.

Sirius will be a state-of-the-art scientific tool for the structural analysis of materials, both organic and inorganic. Its accelerators and beamlines will be housed within a 68,000-square-meter building, which is among the most sophisticated ever built in Brazil, with unprecedented requirements for mechanical and thermal stability.

>Read More