Magnetization ratchet in cylindrical nanowires

A team of researchers from Materials Science Institute of Madrid (CSIC), University of Barcelona and ALBA Synchrotron reported on magnetization ratchet effect observed for the first time in cylindrical magnetic nanowires (magnetic cylinders with diameters of 120nm and lengths of over 20µm).

These nanowires are considered as building blocks for future 3D (vertical) electronic and information storage devices as well as for applications in biological sensing and medicine. The experiments have been carried out at the CIRCE beamline of the ALBA Synchrotron. The results are published in ACS Nano.

The magnetic ratchet effect, which represents a linear or rotary motion of domain walls in only one direction preventing it in the opposite one, originates in the asymmetric energy barrier or pinning sites. Up to now it has been achieved only in limited number of lithographically engineered planar nanostructures. The aim of the experiment was to design and prove the one-directional propagation of magnetic domain walls in cylindrical nanowires.

>Read more on the ALBA website

Image: (extract) Unidirectional propagation of magnetization as seen in micromagnetic simulations and XMCD-PEEM experiments. See entire image here.

Subfilamentary Networks in Memristive Devices

Redox-based memristive devices are one of the most attractive emerging memory technologies.

…in terms of scaling, power consumption and speed. In these devices, external electrical stimuli cause changes of the resistance of an oxide layer sandwiched between two metal electrodes. In the simplest application, the device can be set into a low resistance state (LRS) and reset into a high resistance state (HRS), which may encode a logical one and zero, respectively. The major obstacle delaying large-scale application, however, is the large cycle-to-cycle (C2C) and device-to-device (D2D) variability of both LRS and HRS resistance values. These variabilities describe the stochastic nature of the switching process within one cell, resulting in different resistances obtained for each switching cycle and different resistances obtained for different cells on the same chip.

Read more on the Elettra website.

Image:(a) Schematic of the device geometry. A SrTiO3 layer (blue) is sandwiched between a Nb:SrTiO3 bottom electrode (dark grey) and graphene top electrode (grey honeycomb lattice). The graphene electrode is contacted through a metal lead, which is electrically separated from the continuous bottom electrode, allowing for biasing inside PEEM instruments. (b) Quasistatic I-V curve of a representative graphene/SrTiO3/Nb:SrTiO3 device. The bottom electrode serves as virtual ground, while the bias is applied to the graphene top electrode. (c) PEEM image of a graphene/Al2O3/SrTiO3 device in the LRS at an electron energy E – EF of 3.4 eV. Scale bar, 5 µm. (d) PEEM image of the same device after Reset. (e) and (f) PEEM images after one additional Set and Reset operation, respectively. Insets: magnified photoemission threshold map of the area around the conductive filament. The maps were obtained by fitting the threshold spectrum for each pixel.