LNLS members are awarded

Awards were given in the international conferences ICALEPCS and WIRMS

Two members of the LNLS were recently awarded at international conferences. The engineer Daniel Tavares received the first award granted to early-career professionals by the conference ICALEPCS, related to control systems for large scientific facilities. The researcher Francisco Carlos Barbosa Maia received the award for best poster during the WIRMS event, which brings together staff and users of infrared beamlines from laboratories around the world.

 

Scientists Named 2017 American Physical Society Fellows

Five Brookhaven Lab Scientists recognized for their outstanding contributions

The American Physical Society (APS), the world’s largest physics organization, has elected five scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory as 2017 APS fellows. With more than 53,000 members from academia, government, and industry, APS seeks to advance and share physics knowledge through research journals, scientific meetings, and activities in education, outreach, and advocacy. Each year, a very small percentage of APS members are elevated to the status of fellow through a peer nomination process. Fellows are recognized for their exceptional contributions to physics, including in research, applications, leadership and service, and education.

The 2017 APS fellows representing Brookhaven Lab are Anatoly Frenkel, Morgan May, Rachid Nouicer, Eric Stach, and Peter Steinberg.

Anatoly Frenkel, APS Division of Materials Physics

“For seminal contributions to in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transformative development of structural characterization methods for nanoparticles, and their pioneering applications to a broad range of functional nanomaterials in materials physics and catalysis science.”

Anatoly Frenkel holds a joint appointment as a senior chemist in Brookhaven Lab’s Chemistry Division—where he serves as principal investigator of the Structure and Dynamics of Applied Nanomaterials Group—and tenured professor in Stony Brook University’s Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Department. Frenkel’s research focuses on the application of synchrotron-based x-ray methods to characterize materials and study how their structures and properties relate.

 

>Read more on the NSLS II website

Image: Anatoly Frenkel

 

Case Center receives Resource-Sharing Award

Winners were chosen for successfully sharing resources between institutions and campuses

The Case Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), located at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory—has been awarded second prize in the 2017 Sharing Research Resources competition, held by the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC). Winners were chosen for successfully sharing resources between institutions and campuses, including medical schools, teaching hospitals, and other academic institutions.

For over 20 years, CSB—a partnership between Brookhaven Lab and Case Western Reserve University—has made highly complex and expensive research resources available to thousands of scientists around the world. First at the National Synchrotron Light Source and now at NSLS-II, CSB has supported the construction and operation of multiple experimental stations for studies on the structure and function of biological macromolecules.

>Read more on the NSLS II website

Image: Jennifer Bohon, lead beamline scientist, prepares samples at beamline 17-BM.

 

PSI spin-off GratXray wins Swiss Technology Award 2017

The young company GratXray is developing a new method for early diagnosis of breast cancer.

he Swiss Technology Award is considered Switzerland’s most significant technology prize and annually honours the best technological developments and innovations with high market potential in each of three categories: Inventors, Start-ups, and Innovation Leaders. Swiss companies as well as projects that were developed in Switzerland are eligible to compete. The spin-off GratXray received the prize in the Inventors category, in which young Swiss start-ups as well as innnovative business ideas with high market potential can qualify. In a multi-step application procedure, GratXray won out over its competitors.

Read more on the PSI website.

Image: The Swiss Technology Award in the Inventors category goes to the PSI spin-off GratXray. Accepting the prize, from left to right: Marco Stampanoni, Zhentian Wang, Martin Stauber (CEO of GratXray), and Giorgio Travaglini (head of Technology Transfer at PSI). (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute)

Natalie Larson awarded

She received the Neville B. Smith Student Poster Prize

Natalie Larson, a current ALS doctoral fellow from UC Santa Barbara, won the first prize Neville B. Smith Student Poster Award at the 2017 ALS User Meeting. Larson’s winning poster—”In-situ x-ray computed tomography of defect evolution during polymer impregnation and pyrolysis processing of ceramic matrix composites”—featured the first two big in situ experiments she performed at Beamline 8.3.2.

Larson has been an ALS user since 2014 and became a doctoral fellow in 2016. She’ll continue at the ALS for about another year through a National Science Foundation fellowship that will see her through the end of her PhD. The primary focus of her work is developing high-temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for more efficient jet engines. Larson works with Beamline Scientists Dula Parkinson and Alastair MacDowell and Project Scientist Harold Barnard on developing experiments for in situ x-ray computed tomography experiments to observe 3D real-time defect formation in CMCs.

 

NSRRC Researchers receive Taiwan’s 2017 Presidential Science Prize

Former NSRRC Director C. T. Chen and NSRRC User Andrew H.-J. Wang

Established in 2001, the biennial Presidential Science Prize recognizes innovative researchers who have made outstanding contributions in the fields of mathematics and physical sciences, life sciences, social sciences, and applied sciences. It is considered the nation’s highest scientific honor.

According to the Eligibility and Selection Process of the Prize, the Committee is composed of 15 members, including the President of Academia Sinica as the chair, and the Minister of Science and Technology as the vice chair. This year three winners stood out among 13 nominees: Academician Chien-Te Chen (NSRRC) in mathematics and physical sciences, Academician Andrew H.-J. Wang (Academia Sinica) in life sciences, and Dr. Douglas Yu (Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company) in applied sciences. The awarding ceremony will be held in the Presidential palace and presented by the President in November.

APS scientist earns first J. Evetts award

Ibrahim Kesgin paper won the recognition.

The first Jan Evetts Award for the best paper by a young researcher published in the journal Superconductor Science and Technology has been awarded to Ibrahim Kesgin of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science’s (DOE-SC’s) Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

First-author Kesgin’s paper is entitled, “High-temperature superconducting undulator magnets.” His co-authors are Matthew Kasa and Yury Ivanyushenkov, all of the Accelerator Systems Division of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source, and Ulrich Welp of the Argonne Materials Science Division.

Kasper Kjaer Wins First LCLS Young Investigator Award

The early career award from SLAC’s X-ray laser

Kasper Kjaer is the winner of the inaugural LCLS Young Investigator Award given by the Users Executive Committee of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The prize recognizes scientists in the early stages of their career for exceptional research performed with the LCLS X-ray free-electron laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

“With this award, we’re supporting the new ideas, new insights and new talent at our young facility,” said Mike Dunne, the director of LCLS.

>Read More

 

Prof. Yoshitaka Kimura received the Order of the Sacred Treasure

A disctinction for his long term contribution in the field of education and research activities

In the fall of 2016, Dr. Yoshitaka Kimura, Professor Emeritus of KEK, received the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, from Japanese Government for his long term contribution in the field of education and research activities.

In 1966, he received a Ph.D. at University of Tokyo, and started his career as Research Associate, School of Science, at University of Tokyo. From 1967 to 1968, he developed experimental facilities for nuclear physics using cryogenics and superconductive technologies as Lecturer, School of Engineering. During 1970 and 1971, Dr. Kimura was engaged in the high energy physics experiments with Proton Synchrotron at CERN.

When National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), the predecessor of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), was established in 1971, he came to KEK as Associate Professor. Then he joined design and construction of KEK‘s 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron (KEK-PS). Above all in the machine design, construction of beam transport system, and beam development studies, he played leading role and led KEK-PS to success.