NEXT project receives secretary’s achievement award

On Wednesday, Mar. 14, Under Secretary of Energy Mark Menezes presented the Secretary’s Achievement Award—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Project Management (PM) Award—to the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Experimental Tools (NEXT) project management team for completing the project on schedule and under budget, and for delivering scientific instruments to NSLS-II that will benefit research for years to come.

The NEXT project team coordinated the development and construction of five new beamlines (experimental stations) at NSLS-II, a highly advanced synchrotron light source and a DOE Office of Science User Facility located at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory. Scientists use NSLS-II’s ultra-bright light to study materials with nanoscale resolution and exquisite sensitivity. The five new beamlines developed through NEXT complement the existing beamline portfolio at NSLS-II, and offer new, unique, and cutting-edge scientific capabilities.

“These state-of-the-art beamlines support the DOE Office of Science mission to deliver scientific discoveries and major scientific tools to transform our understanding of nature and to advance the energy, economic, and national security of the United States,” said Robert Caradonna, DOE Brookhaven Site Office Federal Project Director. “This award reflects the drive and dedication of the NEXT project team that made this endeavor a huge success. It was an honor to work with such talented people on such an important a project.”

>Read more on the NSLS-II website

Image: The NEXT team celebrates the completion of the project in NSLS-II’s lobby.
Credit: NSLS II

Marianne Liebi winner of Swedish L’Oréal-Unesco For Women in Science 2018

L’Oréal-Unesco For Women in Science Prize is awarded in Sweden for the third time. The purpose of the prize is to pay attention to and reward young women who have shown great potential in science, while offering positive female role-models. Researchers Marianne Liebi, Chalmers, and Ruth Pöttgen, Lund University, get L’Oréal-Unesco For Women in Science Award, supported by Sweden’s young academy 2018.

Marianne Liebi gets the award “for the constructive use of advanced imaging methods for biomaterials with the aim of understanding the connection between molecular and mechanical properties”. Marianne Liebi uses powerful X-ray technology to study how, for example, the smallest building blocks, collagen fibrils, the bone tissue, look and are organised. The goal is to develop a mimicking, biomimetic material, where nature’s own design principles are imitated and applied to develop artificial bone and cartilage.
“It’s important to show that in research, it does not matter where you come from or who you are – what matters is passion and dedication. At best, this kind of award will not be needed in the future, it would be aimed at all young researchers. It would not matter who you were, says Marianne Liebi.

>Read more on the MAXIV Laboratory website

Photo: Researchers Ruth Pöttgen (left), Lund University, and Marianne Liebi (right), Chalmers, get L’Oréal-Unesco For Women in Science Award 2018, supported by Young Academy Sweden.
Credit: Emma Burendahl

Apply for the Kai Siegbahn prize 2018

The Prize was established in 2009 in honour of Kai Siegbahn, founder of Nuclear Instruments and Methods A (NIMA), who had a strong and lasting commitment to advancing synchrotron radiation science.

The Editorial Board of NIMA is currently accepting nominations for the 2018 award, and we are counting on you to help us identify potential honorees! We invite you to review the award criteria, and to nominate a worthy colleague.

All nominations should be submitted to the Committee Chair by March 31 2018:

Prof. Fulvio Parmigiani, Kai Siegbahn Chair
Department of Physics, University of Trieste
International Faculty, University of Cologne,
Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A.
Email: fulvio.parmigiani@elettra.trieste.it

Nomination criteria:

The Prize aims to recognize and encourage outstanding experimental achievements in synchrotron radiation research with a significant component of instrument development. Particular preference will be given to the development of synchrotron radiation spectroscopies.

Rules and eligibility:

Nominations are open to scientists of all nationalities without regard to the geographical site at which the work was performed. Usually, the prize shall be awarded to one person but it may be shared if all recipients have contributed to the same accomplishment. The prize recipient should be 45 years old or younger at the time of selection.

Nominations are accepted from the NIMA advisory board, the NIMA board of editors, synchrotron radiation facility directors as well as from scientists engaged in synchrotron radiation science. Nomination packages should include a nominating letter, at least one supporting letter, a list of five papers on which the award is based as well as a proposed citation for the award.

Kilian Peter Heeg wins ESRF Young Scientist award

Kilian Peter Heeg has been awarded the title of Young Scientist 2018 by the ESRF User Organisation in recognition of his pioneering work on light-matter interactions enabling resonant brilliance enhancement of X-ray pulses. This award is presented every year at the ESRF annual User Meeting to a scientist aged 37 or younger for outstanding work conducted at the ESRF.

Kilian Heeg is a physicist and postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Aged just 31, Kilian has already significantly shaped the field of X-ray quantum optics.

Kilian says: “I wanted to be a mathematician when I was a child and I was always fascinated by natural sciences. However in my final years in school I fell in love with physics and very quickly became fascinated with quantum mechanics and especially quantum optics. I feel very honoured and pleased to have been chosen as the winner of this year’s ESRF Young Scientist Award.”

>Read more on the ESRF website

Image: Kilian on ESRF’s ID18 beamline
Credit: ESRF/C. Argoud

G. Ghiringhelli and L. Braicovich win 2018 Europhysics Prize of Condensed Matter

>Read more on the ESRF website

 

BER II and BESSY II User Meeting at HZB

More than 600 scientists registered for the 9th annual BER II and BESSY II User Meeting in December.

The Friends of Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin recognised outstanding work in the field of synchrotron radiation with an Innovation Award, and the best doctoral dissertation with the Ernst-Eckard-Koch prize.

Research with synchrotron radiation was the focus on Wednesday. On Thursday, the „Science Day“, a broad overview on user research was given. The public talk entitled “Interfacing with the brain using organic electronics” found great appeal with the audience: George Malliaras from the University of Cambridge spoke about the potential of organic electronics as brain implants for treating neurological diseases such as epilepsy. New materials and their characterisation at synchrotron sources will play a crucial role in this development. A vendor exhibition by 56 companies on new technical and optical instruments for research was well visited by the scientists.

>Read more on the HZB website.

Image: The Innovation Award of Freundeskreis HZB was given to a team of DESY, Hamburg.
Credit: HZB

2017 ANSTO, Australian Synchrotron Stephen Wilkins Medal awarded

Leonie van ‘t Hag has been awarded the Australian Synchrotron S. Wilkins Medal for her PhD thesis

The award recognises her research to improve the method to crystallise proteins and peptides in order to study their structure, using a technique called crystallography. “Leonie’s insights into crystallisation processes could significantly help the development of treatments for a variety of illnesses,” said Australian Synchrotron Director, Professor Andrew Peele.

Most solid material in the world is made of crystalline structures. Crystals are made up of rows and rows of atoms or molecules stacked up like boxes in a warehouse, in different arrangements.

The science of determining these atomic or molecular structures from crystalline materials is called crystallography.

LNLS members are awarded

Awards were given in the international conferences ICALEPCS and WIRMS

Two members of the LNLS were recently awarded at international conferences. The engineer Daniel Tavares received the first award granted to early-career professionals by the conference ICALEPCS, related to control systems for large scientific facilities. The researcher Francisco Carlos Barbosa Maia received the award for best poster during the WIRMS event, which brings together staff and users of infrared beamlines from laboratories around the world.

 

Scientists Named 2017 American Physical Society Fellows

Five Brookhaven Lab Scientists recognized for their outstanding contributions

The American Physical Society (APS), the world’s largest physics organization, has elected five scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory as 2017 APS fellows. With more than 53,000 members from academia, government, and industry, APS seeks to advance and share physics knowledge through research journals, scientific meetings, and activities in education, outreach, and advocacy. Each year, a very small percentage of APS members are elevated to the status of fellow through a peer nomination process. Fellows are recognized for their exceptional contributions to physics, including in research, applications, leadership and service, and education.

The 2017 APS fellows representing Brookhaven Lab are Anatoly Frenkel, Morgan May, Rachid Nouicer, Eric Stach, and Peter Steinberg.

Anatoly Frenkel, APS Division of Materials Physics

“For seminal contributions to in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transformative development of structural characterization methods for nanoparticles, and their pioneering applications to a broad range of functional nanomaterials in materials physics and catalysis science.”

Anatoly Frenkel holds a joint appointment as a senior chemist in Brookhaven Lab’s Chemistry Division—where he serves as principal investigator of the Structure and Dynamics of Applied Nanomaterials Group—and tenured professor in Stony Brook University’s Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Department. Frenkel’s research focuses on the application of synchrotron-based x-ray methods to characterize materials and study how their structures and properties relate.

 

>Read more on the NSLS II website

Image: Anatoly Frenkel

 

Case Center receives Resource-Sharing Award

Winners were chosen for successfully sharing resources between institutions and campuses

The Case Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), located at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory—has been awarded second prize in the 2017 Sharing Research Resources competition, held by the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC). Winners were chosen for successfully sharing resources between institutions and campuses, including medical schools, teaching hospitals, and other academic institutions.

For over 20 years, CSB—a partnership between Brookhaven Lab and Case Western Reserve University—has made highly complex and expensive research resources available to thousands of scientists around the world. First at the National Synchrotron Light Source and now at NSLS-II, CSB has supported the construction and operation of multiple experimental stations for studies on the structure and function of biological macromolecules.

>Read more on the NSLS II website

Image: Jennifer Bohon, lead beamline scientist, prepares samples at beamline 17-BM.

 

PSI spin-off GratXray wins Swiss Technology Award 2017

The young company GratXray is developing a new method for early diagnosis of breast cancer.

he Swiss Technology Award is considered Switzerland’s most significant technology prize and annually honours the best technological developments and innovations with high market potential in each of three categories: Inventors, Start-ups, and Innovation Leaders. Swiss companies as well as projects that were developed in Switzerland are eligible to compete. The spin-off GratXray received the prize in the Inventors category, in which young Swiss start-ups as well as innnovative business ideas with high market potential can qualify. In a multi-step application procedure, GratXray won out over its competitors.

Read more on the PSI website.

Image: The Swiss Technology Award in the Inventors category goes to the PSI spin-off GratXray. Accepting the prize, from left to right: Marco Stampanoni, Zhentian Wang, Martin Stauber (CEO of GratXray), and Giorgio Travaglini (head of Technology Transfer at PSI). (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute)

Natalie Larson awarded

She received the Neville B. Smith Student Poster Prize

Natalie Larson, a current ALS doctoral fellow from UC Santa Barbara, won the first prize Neville B. Smith Student Poster Award at the 2017 ALS User Meeting. Larson’s winning poster—”In-situ x-ray computed tomography of defect evolution during polymer impregnation and pyrolysis processing of ceramic matrix composites”—featured the first two big in situ experiments she performed at Beamline 8.3.2.

Larson has been an ALS user since 2014 and became a doctoral fellow in 2016. She’ll continue at the ALS for about another year through a National Science Foundation fellowship that will see her through the end of her PhD. The primary focus of her work is developing high-temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for more efficient jet engines. Larson works with Beamline Scientists Dula Parkinson and Alastair MacDowell and Project Scientist Harold Barnard on developing experiments for in situ x-ray computed tomography experiments to observe 3D real-time defect formation in CMCs.

 

NSRRC Researchers receive Taiwan’s 2017 Presidential Science Prize

Former NSRRC Director C. T. Chen and NSRRC User Andrew H.-J. Wang

Established in 2001, the biennial Presidential Science Prize recognizes innovative researchers who have made outstanding contributions in the fields of mathematics and physical sciences, life sciences, social sciences, and applied sciences. It is considered the nation’s highest scientific honor.

According to the Eligibility and Selection Process of the Prize, the Committee is composed of 15 members, including the President of Academia Sinica as the chair, and the Minister of Science and Technology as the vice chair. This year three winners stood out among 13 nominees: Academician Chien-Te Chen (NSRRC) in mathematics and physical sciences, Academician Andrew H.-J. Wang (Academia Sinica) in life sciences, and Dr. Douglas Yu (Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company) in applied sciences. The awarding ceremony will be held in the Presidential palace and presented by the President in November.

APS scientist earns first J. Evetts award

Ibrahim Kesgin paper won the recognition.

The first Jan Evetts Award for the best paper by a young researcher published in the journal Superconductor Science and Technology has been awarded to Ibrahim Kesgin of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science’s (DOE-SC’s) Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

First-author Kesgin’s paper is entitled, “High-temperature superconducting undulator magnets.” His co-authors are Matthew Kasa and Yury Ivanyushenkov, all of the Accelerator Systems Division of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source, and Ulrich Welp of the Argonne Materials Science Division.

Kasper Kjaer Wins First LCLS Young Investigator Award

The early career award from SLAC’s X-ray laser

Kasper Kjaer is the winner of the inaugural LCLS Young Investigator Award given by the Users Executive Committee of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The prize recognizes scientists in the early stages of their career for exceptional research performed with the LCLS X-ray free-electron laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

“With this award, we’re supporting the new ideas, new insights and new talent at our young facility,” said Mike Dunne, the director of LCLS.

>Read More

 

Prof. Yoshitaka Kimura received the Order of the Sacred Treasure

A disctinction for his long term contribution in the field of education and research activities

In the fall of 2016, Dr. Yoshitaka Kimura, Professor Emeritus of KEK, received the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, from Japanese Government for his long term contribution in the field of education and research activities.

In 1966, he received a Ph.D. at University of Tokyo, and started his career as Research Associate, School of Science, at University of Tokyo. From 1967 to 1968, he developed experimental facilities for nuclear physics using cryogenics and superconductive technologies as Lecturer, School of Engineering. During 1970 and 1971, Dr. Kimura was engaged in the high energy physics experiments with Proton Synchrotron at CERN.

When National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), the predecessor of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), was established in 1971, he came to KEK as Associate Professor. Then he joined design and construction of KEK‘s 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron (KEK-PS). Above all in the machine design, construction of beam transport system, and beam development studies, he played leading role and led KEK-PS to success.