Questioning the universality of the charge density wave nature…

… in electron-doped cuprates

The first superconductor materials discovered offer no electrical resistance to a current only at extremely low temperatures (less than 30 K or −243.2°C). The discovery of materials that show superconductivity at much higher temperatures (up to 138 K or −135°C) are called high-temperature superconductors (HTSC). For the last 30 years, scientists have researched cuprate materials, which contain copper-oxide planes in their structures, for their high-temperature superconducting abilities. To understand the superconducting behavior in the cuprates, researchers have looked to correlations with the charge density wave (CDW), caused by the ordered quantum field of electrons in the material. It has been assumed that the CDW in a normal (non-superconducting) state is indicative of the electron behavior at the lower temperature superconducting state. A team of scientists from SLAC, Japan, and Michigan compared the traits of superconducting and non-superconducting cuprate materials in the normal state to test if the CDW is correlated to superconductivity.

>Read more on the SSRL website

Picture: explanation in detail to read in the full scientific highlight (SSRL website)

 

 

 

G. Ghiringhelli and L. Braicovich win 2018 Europhysics Prize of Condensed Matter

>Read more on the ESRF website

 

First users welcomed to I21

Diamond’s Inelastic X-ray Scattering beamline has celebrated an important milestone.

This new beamline is dedicated to Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) producing highly monochromatised, focused and tunable X-rays. It is suited to investigate the electronic, magnetic and lattice dynamics of samples particularly those with magnetic and electronic interactions.

“Considering the exceptional progress of the RIXS technique in the last few years, and the unique capabilities that I21 will offer to our UK and international community, we are extremely pleased to celebrate first users on I21,” says Laurent Chapon, Physical Sciences Director at Diamond. “Dr Kejin Zhou and his team, Diamond’s engineers and all support groups have worked incredibly hard to deliver this new beamline with an energy resolution and count rates already very close to the expected final targets. This is just the start of a great adventure, and we are looking forward to exploiting I21’s high-resolution for measurements of local and collective excitations in solid state materials. Our future investments to extend the energy range as well as delivering a polarimeter will reinforce the position of I21 as a world-leading facility.”

>Read More on the Diamond Light Source website

Photo: The I21 beamline time with first users from university of Bristol.