Newly discovered photosynthesis enzyme yields evolutionary clues

Rubisco is one of the oldest carbon-fixing enzymes on the planet, taking CO2 from the atmosphere and fixing it into sugar for plants and other photosynthetic organisms. Form I (“form one”) rubisco goes back nearly 2.4 billion years and is a key focus of scientists studying the evolution of life as well as those seeking to develop bio-based fuels and renewable-energy technologies. A newly discovered form of rubisco—dubbed form I′ (“one prime”)—is thought to represent a missing link in the evolution of photosynthetic organisms, potentially providing clues as to how this enzyme changed the planet.

To learn how form I′ rubisco compares to other rubisco enzymes, researchers performed x-ray crystallography at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamline 8.2.2. Then, to capture how the enzyme’s structure changes during different states of activity, they applied small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) using Beamline 12.3.1 (SIBYLS). This combination of approaches enables scientists to construct unprecedented models of complex molecules as they appear in nature.

Read more on the ALS website

Image: A ribbon diagram (left) and molecular surface representation (right) of carbon-fixing form I′ rubisco, showing eight molecular subunits without the small subunits found in other forms of rubisco. An x-ray diffraction pattern of the enzyme, also generated by the research team, is in the background.

Credit: Henrique Pereira/Berkeley Lab

Diamond helps uncover how an untreatable cancer-causing virus affects immune cells

Scientists have found that human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type 1 (HTLV-1) hijacks cellular machinery to establish an infection.  

Research was undertaken using cutting-edge visualisation techniques such as X-ray crystallography, which was undertaken at Diamond, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).  

HTLV-1 is a virus that affects T cells, a type of white blood cell which plays a crucial role in our immune system. Currently, between five and 20 million people worldwide are infected by HTLV-1 and no cure or treatment is available. While most people infected with the virus do not experience symptoms, around two to five per cent will go on to develop adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL).  

New research, led by a team from Imperial College London and the Francis Crick Institute, shows in atomic detail how HTLV-1 infects immune cells. By providing a more nuanced understanding of how the virus establishes infection in the body, the research will help to support the development of new, targeted therapies. 

Read more on the Diamond Light Source website

Image: Scanning electron micrograph of a human T lymphocyte (also called a T cell) from the immune system of a healthy donor. Credit: NIAID