Significant progress on ultraflexible solar cells

Research from Monash University, the University of Tokyo and RIKEN, partly undertaken at the Australian Synchrotron, has produced an ultra-flexible ultra-thin organic solar cell that delivered a world-leading performance under significant stretching and strain.

The development paves the way forward for a new class of stretchable and bendable solar cells in wearable devices, such as fitness and health trackers, and smart watches with complex curved surfaces.

The advance, which was published in Joule, was made possible by designing an ultra-thin material based on a blend of polymer, fullerene and non-fullerene molecules with the desired mechanical properties and power efficiency, according to Dr Wenchao Huang, a Research Fellow at Monash University and the article’s first author.
The thickness of the solar cell film is only three micrometres, which is ten times smaller than the width of a human hair.

Dr Huang, who completed his PhD in the lab of Prof Chris McNeill at Monash on flexible organic solar cells, received the Australian Synchrotron’s Stephen Wilkins Medal in 2016 for his exceptional doctoral thesis that made use of the synchrotron-based research capabilities at the facility.

>Read more no the Autralian Lightsource at ANSTO website

Image: Schematic of ultraflexible solar cell

Assembly lines for designer bioactive compounds

Researchers successfully bioengineered changes to a molecular “assembly line” for bioactive compounds, based in part on insights gained from small-angle x-ray scattering at the Advanced Light Source (ALS).

The ability to re-engineer these assembly lines could improve their performance and facilitate the synthesis of new medically useful compounds.

Microbes are known to possess molecular “assembly lines” that produce an important class of compounds, many of which have uses as antibiotics, antifungals, and immunosuppressants. The compounds are peptides—chains of amino acids like RNA, but shorter and produced, not by ribosomes, but by cellular machines known as nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs).

>Read more on the Advanced Light Source website

Image: Top: Comparison of experimental SAXS scattering data (black) with theoretical curves (green) obtained using an ensemble optimization method (EOM) shows excellent agreement. Bottom: LgrA structural models corresponding to the EOM analyses show large differences in conformation, similar to the differences observed using crystallography.