Sirius ever closer to reality

Construction works are at 84% and the electron accelerator begins to be assembled in March.

The construction of Sirius, the new Brazilian synchrotron light source, is advancing. In March, the first of the three electron accelerators begins to be installed: the LINAC, or linear accelerator, which is responsible for the initial emission and acceleration of the electrons. The building, now 84% completed, will soon be in the right conditions to receive installation of the remaining electron accelerators: booster and storage ring.

Sirius is the largest and most complex scientific infrastructure ever built in Brazil. Sirius will be a state-of-the-art scientific tool, open to the research community from Brazil and abroad. The new synchrotron light source will open new perspectives for research in strategic areas such as health, agriculture, energy, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and many others.

Construction Challenges
The 68,000-square-foot Sirius building is among the most sophisticated constructions ever built in the Brazil, with unprecedented mechanical and thermal stability requirements.
In December 2017, the most critical phase of the construction was completed: the installation of the floor where the electron accelerators will be installed.

>Read more on the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory website

Image: Comparison between Sirius simulation when project (top) and photo of civil works in February 2018 (bottom).

Lt. Gov. Hochul announces $15M from state for CHESS upgrade

The funding announcement was held before a gathering of approximately 75 media members, CHESS scientists and Cornell staff at Wilson Synchrotron Laboratory.

Also making brief remarks were President Martha E. Pollack, State Sen. Thomas O’Mara, R-58th District, Assemblywoman Barbara Lifton, D-125th, and Alex Deyhim M.S. ’93, MBA ’98, CEO of Advanced Design Consulting in Lansing, New York, who detailed some of the benefits his company has reaped as a result of the CHESS funding.

CHESS, which annually attracts more than 1,200 users from around the world to take advantage of its world-class X-ray beams, is using the funding for its “CHESS-U” upgrade initiative. The grant will provide CHESS with enhanced capabilities, making it a leading synchrotron source in the U.S. for high-energy, high-flux studies.

Located 40 feet below the Cornell campus, the nearly half-mile-long accelerator and storage ring is being upgraded to enhance X-ray capabilities generated by rotating positrons.

 

>Read more on the CHESS website

Image: Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul speaks to a gathering of about 75 media and Cornell staff, announcing a $15 million grant to the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), through the Upstate Revitalization Initiative, Nov. 15 at Wilson Laboratory.

 

Robert O. Hettel to lead APS upgrade

He has been appointed director of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project.

Robert O. Hettel will join Argonne National Laboratory in November 2017. Hettel, a veteran accelerator designer and expert on storage ring light sources, comes to Argonne from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Laboratory that includes the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL).

In his new role, Hettel will oversee the planning, construction and implementation of the Upgrade of Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source (APS), a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility. This $770 million project will create the world’s ultimate three-dimensional microscope and enable researchers to view and manipulate matter at the atomic level to solve complex science problems across multiple disciplines.