Twin Orbit operation successfully tested at BESSY II

The first “Twin Orbit User Test week” at BESSY II in February 2018 was a big success and can be considered as an important step towards real user operation.

Physicists at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin have been able to store two separate electron beams in one storage ring. The twin orbit operation mode can serve users with different needs of the time structure of the photon pulses simultaneously and offers elegant options regarding the future project BESSY VSR.

The Twin Orbit operation mode makes use of non-linear beam dynamics and provides two stable well separated orbits for storing two electron beams in one storage ring. The bunch fill patterns of both orbits can be chosen, to some extent, independently, which allows for fulfilling normally incompatible user needs, simultaneously. For example, one orbit can be used to store a homogenous multi bunch fill to deliver high average brilliance for photon hungry experiments, whereas only one single bunch is stored on the other orbit for timing experiments, providing a much lower pulse repetition rate.

>Read more on the Bessy II at HZB website

Image: A synchrotron source point image of a bending magnet of the Twin Orbit modus. The second orbit closes after three revolution and is winding around the standard orbit at the center. (full image here)
Credit: HZB

Major upgrade of the NCD beamline

The NCD beamline, now NCD-SWEET, devoted to Small Angle and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS, WAXS), is offering users further experimental possibilities and higher quality data.

The SAXS beamline of ALBA has gone through a major upgrade in 2017. Upgraded items in the SAXS WAXS experimental techniques (SWEET) involve a new monochromator system, a new photon counting detector (Pilatus 1M), a new sample table with an additional rotating stage, and a beam conditioning optics with µ-focus and GISAXS options.

The original double crystal monochromator (DCM) has been replaced by a channel-cut silicon (1 1 1), improving the beam stability at sample position up to 0.9% and 0.4% of the beam size horizontally and vertically, respectivelly.

>Read more on the ALBA website

Figure: Vertical beam profile with the Be lenses into the beam (Horizontal axis unit is mm). The plot is the derivative of an edge scan along the vertical direction. The horizontal beam profile shows a gaussian shape as well.

Sirius ever closer to reality

Construction works are at 84% and the electron accelerator begins to be assembled in March.

The construction of Sirius, the new Brazilian synchrotron light source, is advancing. In March, the first of the three electron accelerators begins to be installed: the LINAC, or linear accelerator, which is responsible for the initial emission and acceleration of the electrons. The building, now 84% completed, will soon be in the right conditions to receive installation of the remaining electron accelerators: booster and storage ring.

Sirius is the largest and most complex scientific infrastructure ever built in Brazil. Sirius will be a state-of-the-art scientific tool, open to the research community from Brazil and abroad. The new synchrotron light source will open new perspectives for research in strategic areas such as health, agriculture, energy, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and many others.

Construction Challenges
The 68,000-square-foot Sirius building is among the most sophisticated constructions ever built in the Brazil, with unprecedented mechanical and thermal stability requirements.
In December 2017, the most critical phase of the construction was completed: the installation of the floor where the electron accelerators will be installed.

>Read more on the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory website

Image: Comparison between Sirius simulation when project (top) and photo of civil works in February 2018 (bottom).

Lt. Gov. Hochul announces $15M from state for CHESS upgrade

The funding announcement was held before a gathering of approximately 75 media members, CHESS scientists and Cornell staff at Wilson Synchrotron Laboratory.

Also making brief remarks were President Martha E. Pollack, State Sen. Thomas O’Mara, R-58th District, Assemblywoman Barbara Lifton, D-125th, and Alex Deyhim M.S. ’93, MBA ’98, CEO of Advanced Design Consulting in Lansing, New York, who detailed some of the benefits his company has reaped as a result of the CHESS funding.

CHESS, which annually attracts more than 1,200 users from around the world to take advantage of its world-class X-ray beams, is using the funding for its “CHESS-U” upgrade initiative. The grant will provide CHESS with enhanced capabilities, making it a leading synchrotron source in the U.S. for high-energy, high-flux studies.

Located 40 feet below the Cornell campus, the nearly half-mile-long accelerator and storage ring is being upgraded to enhance X-ray capabilities generated by rotating positrons.

 

>Read more on the CHESS website

Image: Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul speaks to a gathering of about 75 media and Cornell staff, announcing a $15 million grant to the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), through the Upstate Revitalization Initiative, Nov. 15 at Wilson Laboratory.

 

Robert O. Hettel to lead APS upgrade

He has been appointed director of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project.

Robert O. Hettel will join Argonne National Laboratory in November 2017. Hettel, a veteran accelerator designer and expert on storage ring light sources, comes to Argonne from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Laboratory that includes the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL).

In his new role, Hettel will oversee the planning, construction and implementation of the Upgrade of Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source (APS), a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility. This $770 million project will create the world’s ultimate three-dimensional microscope and enable researchers to view and manipulate matter at the atomic level to solve complex science problems across multiple disciplines.